Franchise Weekend – The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006)

Director: Justin Lin

Writer: Chris Morgan (Screenplay)

Starring: Lucas Black, Shad Moss, Brian Tee, Sung Kang, Nathalie Kelley, Leonardo Nam, Brian Goodman, JJ Sonny Chiba

 

Plot: A teenager becomes a major competitor in the world of drift racing after moving in with his father in Tokyo to avoid a jail sentence in America.

 

There may be spoilers the rest of the review

 

Verdict: The Weak Link

 

Story: The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift starts as we meet typical quiet high school student Sean Boswell (Black) who gets tricked into a street race against the jock Clay (Bryan), this leads to all involved getting arrests and injured. Punishment for Sean it movie to Tokyo, Japan to live with his father Major Boswell (Goodman). Making friends the way only Sean can he finds Twinkie (Moss) who shows him the underground street racing where they don’t just race, they drift. It also doesn’t take long for Sean to make enemies with the best drifter in town D.K. (Tee) with Han (Kang) wanting to see just how good Sean is.

Sean fails in this first race but this drives him to learn how to drift with Han showing him but D.K keeping his eyes on him as he goes to impress the Yakuza uncle of his.

 

Thoughts on The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift

 

Characters/PerformanceSean is randomly selected to be our new lead, he has no connection to the previous films and is a high school student always getting himself into trouble, he is from a broken home and happens to enjoy racing, he gets set to a new country and ends up having to prove to be different to his own father. DK is a hot-headed villain but is nothing but his temper gets himself into trouble and answers to his uncle. Neela is the love interest but nothing more. We get our first introduction to Han in this film but he is only the wiser supporting character.

Performance wise, Lucas Black is miss-cast because he looks so old for a teenager, it would be fair to say none of the performances are that great in this film Sung Kang is good as we get to learn about his character more but otherwise, no one famous enough is in this film.

StoryHigh schoolers street racing, well this film completely confuses me for storytelling because how do these kids especially the poor one in Sean afford street racing cars and insurance? Come on this is ridiculous. Throw into the mix the idea of the Yakuza’s I guess we get a real threat in the villain now, well I just couldn’t get into this story it doesn’t fit into the franchise and is clearly the worst.

Action/Crime/ThrillerThe only positive here, the race sequences are the best so far in the franchise, using the Yakuza’s doesn’t mean you have a good crime story because the only illegal actions in this film is the street racing, you are also not left on edge like before.

SettingsTokyo is a brilliant setting because it shows the different mindset for the street racing through the packed streets.

Special EffectsThis is another moment where the special effects are all you need them to be without being special in anyway.

Final ThoughtsThe story confuses but the race sequences are all fun, I couldn’t get my mind around how these high school kids are doing all this racing.

 

Overall: The worst in the franchise from the director who gave us the best too.

Rating

 

 

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I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore (2017)

Director: Macon Blair

Writer: Macon Blair (Screenplay)

Starring: Melanie Lynskey, Elijah Wood, Michelle Moreno, Devon Graye, Jane Levy, Christine Woods,

 

Plot: When a depressed woman is burglarized, she finds a new sense of purpose by tracking down the thieves alongside her obnoxious neighbor. But they soon find themselves dangerously out of their depth against a pack of degenerate criminals.

 

There may be spoilers the rest of the review

 

Verdict: Quirky Fun Comedy

 

Story: I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore starts as we follow our lonely woman Ruth (Lynskey) who lives her normal routine and finds herself getting stepped on by people but not standing up for herself. When Ruth’s house gets burglarized she struggles to get help from the police.

Ruth recruits her neighbour Tony (Wood) to help her get her belongs back as the two enter underground crime world as Tony meets the man that stole from her Christian (Graye) and the gang he is part off with Dez (Levy) and Marshall (Yow).

 

Thoughts on I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore

 

Characters – Ruth is a lonely depressed woman who does let people walk over her, keeps to herself until her comfy life is shattered when her home is broken into. We see her learn to stand up for herself to collect her belongings and accept people into her life. Tony is the obnoxious neighbour that likes loud music, keeping to himself and his dog Kevin, but learning about what happened to Ruth he steps up into the world showing he just wants to be part of someone else’s life. Christian is the waster who steals to get by with a gang of thieves, not caring who he steps on to get stuff to feed his habits.

PerformanceMelanie Lynskey and Elijah Wood are both fantastic in the leading roles showing both these stars are great and can continue to find success in smaller films. When you look the three main criminal roles we have good performances but none of them seem to offer much to the characters that we have seen before.

StoryThe story of feeling out of place in the world after a crime happen against you is one I feel people will understand, this does talk about how far people could go to get out of the rut by taking a chance on things but mostly it shows how the good people working together could stop the bad people in the world.

Comedy/CrimeThe comedy comes from nearly all the scenes with Ruth and Tony together trying to enter the crime world, the crime world shows us the world the innocent side of the story enter.

SettingsWe get a small town setting showing how people’s lives would cross at some point.

Scene of the Movie – The first team outing looking for laptop.

That Moment That Annoyed Me It does get dark in final third of the film.

Final ThoughtsThis is the gem people have talked about, it has all the quirkiness you would expect from the odd crime comedy that works.

 

Overall: Enjoyable and quirky crime comedy.

Rating